Category Archives: Welcome

“Nothing About Us Without Us”

“Nothing About Us Without Us.” This is such an important statement when it comes to disability advocacy. In my journey as a mom of a child with autism, I have had to change my thinking and my way of speaking about AJ, my child with autism. AJ has been nonverbal in the past but he has used an iPad to communicate along with a picture board, and now is becoming much more verbal. As he grows in being able to tell us what his needs and wants are, I am growing in my understanding that I can advocate for him, but I do not really speak for him. He does speak for himself, in words and in other forms of communication.

There is a great blog I want to share from Ivanova Smith, an intern at the ARC of King County here in Washington State where Danae and I live, who writes these very words: “Nothing About Us Without Us.” She also writes that we need to move away from Autism Awareness to Autism Acceptance. Read her article here.

For parents, when their child is first diagnosed with autism, they are given a packet of resources from the doctor or diagnosing team, full of information about services and parent support. I was never given information about how to connect with adults with autism or others to hear their experiences. I knew autism was a spectrum disorder, but all I knew at that time was my child, and later, other parents of children with autism. As much as we want to advocate for our children, sometimes our voice ends up being advocating for ourselves. We complain about lack of resources, but our complaints can turn towards our children, instead of advocating for them.

Now that I know autistic youth and adults, I realize where I have been speaking for others with autism, instead of listening. In the church, we need to include all people of all abilities. We need to include disabled people not only in worship, but in leadership. We need to be better about including people with autism, especially our pastors, youth leaders, music directors and others.

So I am writing now, but we are reaching out to invite others with autism to share their experiences of church, to build a more inclusive vision of who we ought to be as the body of Christ. I invite you to comment here and introduce yourself, and perhaps you can share your story as well.

(Un)Resolved

This is a piece I wrote for Edge Pieces, the blog of Open Gathering. Open Gathering is a church started by my husband, J.C., (and I am now on staff there as well) that is open to all people but especially children and adults with disabilities and their families. The vision really began as a dream for our son, a church in which he would be free to worship as he is, and at the same time introducing the Christian story and worship experience to him and others, including neurotypical children and adults as well as people of all abilities.  To learn a little about our church, you can visit our website, and you can click on this article I wrote for the UncoSynchro blog theme for January.

http://opengathering.org/unresolved/

Wandering and Welcome

This was a piece originally published on [D]mergent back in April 2014 for Autism Awareness Month, about a time my son wandered off (and we had to call the police, but we did find him about a block away) and thinking of the time Jesus wandered off at the end of Luke chapter 2. As we near the end of the Christmas season (the Twelve Days of Christmas in the Christian tradition) and away from Jesus’ childhood, I thought of this and wanted to share.

http://dmergent.org/articles/2014/4/1/wandering-and-welcome

First Steps

I began blogging about our journey with autism over three years ago, just before our child was first diagnosed, over on my site Rev-o-lution.  At the time, in 2011, my family lived in Oklahoma. This first blog entry, “Top Ten things I have learned along the autism spectrum journey” sums up a little of what I had experienced prior to AJ’s diagnosis, as it was written the day before.  The evening after our son’s appointment and diagnosis, I wrote “1 in 110 children, 1 in 70 boys” (which was the diagnosis rate statistics in 2011–it is currently 1 out of 68 children and 1 out of 42 boys according to the CDC).  And about a year later, once we had moved to the Seattle area, I wrote “The Starbucks Welcome” about challenges we have faced, as well as times we were embraced by the church when visiting with our child with autism.

These were my first blog posts. The first steps for anyone to learn about welcoming people with autism into the church is to listen to one’s story. Listen to a family with a child with autism. Meet an adult with autism. Listen to their stories. Learn their challenges as well as their gifts (notice in both blog posts, I listed some of AJ’s gifts). And if you are a parent of someone with autism or you yourself are on the autism spectrum, it is important to share your stories, too.

Welcome to Autism and Church!

Here we will blog about our experiences of having a family member with autism and ways in which church is enhanced by having people with autism as members. We will also blog the challenges and difficulties, suggestions we have for church to be more welcoming, and more. We also invite and welcome individuals with autism to share their experience as well!