Tag Archives: visiting a church

(Un)Resolved

This is a piece I wrote for Edge Pieces, the blog of Open Gathering. Open Gathering is a church started by my husband, J.C., (and I am now on staff there as well) that is open to all people but especially children and adults with disabilities and their families. The vision really began as a dream for our son, a church in which he would be free to worship as he is, and at the same time introducing the Christian story and worship experience to him and others, including neurotypical children and adults as well as people of all abilities.  To learn a little about our church, you can visit our website, and you can click on this article I wrote for the UncoSynchro blog theme for January.

http://opengathering.org/unresolved/

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First Steps

I began blogging about our journey with autism over three years ago, just before our child was first diagnosed, over on my site Rev-o-lution.  At the time, in 2011, my family lived in Oklahoma. This first blog entry, “Top Ten things I have learned along the autism spectrum journey” sums up a little of what I had experienced prior to AJ’s diagnosis, as it was written the day before.  The evening after our son’s appointment and diagnosis, I wrote “1 in 110 children, 1 in 70 boys” (which was the diagnosis rate statistics in 2011–it is currently 1 out of 68 children and 1 out of 42 boys according to the CDC).  And about a year later, once we had moved to the Seattle area, I wrote “The Starbucks Welcome” about challenges we have faced, as well as times we were embraced by the church when visiting with our child with autism.

These were my first blog posts. The first steps for anyone to learn about welcoming people with autism into the church is to listen to one’s story. Listen to a family with a child with autism. Meet an adult with autism. Listen to their stories. Learn their challenges as well as their gifts (notice in both blog posts, I listed some of AJ’s gifts). And if you are a parent of someone with autism or you yourself are on the autism spectrum, it is important to share your stories, too.